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Randy Morrow, Certified Real Estate Divorce Specialist, P. 6

In this sixth and final segment of Ron and Robert’s interview with Virginia’s leading Real Estate Divorce Specialist, the gentlemen discuss the difference between distributive bargaining (which is what you get when you go to court) and collaborative negotiation, which is what happens in a Collaborative Divorce. We like to tell the story of the orange:

Two young siblings are fighting over an orange. Their father walks in on them, takes the orange away, cuts it in half, and hands a half to each. Sister bursts into tears. “Why are you crying?” asks the perplexed father. “You and your brother both wanted the orange, there was only one orange, so I cut it in half. You should be happy.”

“I don’t want half!” sobs Sister. “I only wanted the peel. I need it for a cake I’m baking, but I have to have the whole peel.”

“Oh. Bobby?” He asks Brother, “Will you give your sister the whole peel if she’ll let you have the whole inside?”

Brother’s eyes light up. “Gee, sure! I didn’t want the crummy peel anyway.”

And that, dear friends, is the difference between distributive bargaining and collaborative negotiation.

The gents go into more detail about distributive bargaining, and then they talk about how to divide a property that was owned prior to marriage, what happens if you file bankruptcy during divorce, and whether or not you should keep your house if you file for bankruptcy.

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Missed the first five parts of this series? Here’s Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4, and Part 5.

Don’t miss another one! Subscribe to Ron and Robert on Divorce on iTunes and get free podcasts every week.

Mary Culbert’s ABCs of Mediation (Part 2 of 3)

What’s the difference between community mediation programs and private mediators?  Are there different styles of mediation? What kinds of mediation are available?  When can mediation come in handy?  What kind of ethical duty do mediators have to make sure everyone gets a fair shake? How do you complete your case after you’ve made a mediated agreement? Are there ever situations when mediation is not a good idea?

Mary Culbert, Bilingual Certified Mediator, Associate Clinical Professor at Loyola Law School, and president of The Loyola Law School Center for Conflict Resolution answers every question you’ve ever had about mediation but were afraid to ask. (Special thanks to Ron and Robert on Divorce for asking the tough questions.)

Missed last week’s episode? Listen now:

Part 1: Mediation giant Mary Culbert discusses how her family history and a background in theatre paved the way to her career as a peacemaker.

Don’t miss another episode! Subscribe to Ron and Robert on Divorce on iTunes.

Overcoming Overwhelms

Photo by Grendl on Flickr

Overwhelm happens when we start worrying about the future, or obsessing over the past. Overwhelm happens when we disregard our inner feedback and ignore our intuition. What is it that’s overwhelming?  It’s usually our thoughts, it’s usually the unmet expectations. When we’re in overwhelm, we tend to constrict ourselves. Our breathing becomes shallow, we lose connection with the earth. Something as simple as walking barefoot through the grass can reestablish who you are as a person. — Dr. Lin Morel

Last week Dr. Morel talked about using our breath as a tool to find inner strength.  In the fifth installment of Ron and Robert’s interview with Dr. Lin Morel, she talks about overcoming overwhelms, learning to forgive ourselves so we can forgive others, how communication begins with self-communication, and much more.

Click the play button below to listen to this wonderful, insightful interview.

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