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The Third Wednesday

Although it may be one of the best kept secrets of the Los Angeles Superior Court, the LACBA/SFVBA-sponsored Third Wednesday Voluntary Settlement Conference Program is designed to turn the misfortune of the current budget crisis into an opportunity to settle cases.  Each family law department in Los Angeles County may assign up to two cases each month to the VSC program, which provides three hours of free mediation on the third Wednesday of each month in the private office of an experienced family law attorney serving as a voluntary settlement officer.

In the event that a case has not been resolved after three hours of free mediation, counsel is encouraged to retain the services of the volunteer mediator to resolve any remaining issues. The program, which commenced in February 2010, had incredible success in March.  Five out of seven assigned cases were completely settled, and a sixth is still engaged in peaceful mediation with a volunteer mediator.

If you’re going through a divorce in Los Angeles County and you’re afraid you’re headed to trial, ask your attorney about having your case assigned to the VSC program.  You’ll be glad you did.

The Seven Options for Divorce: Number Four

The fourth option for divorce is Arbitration, which is quite different from our first three options.  The Kitchen Table Divorce is casual, creative, quick and inexpensive.  Mediation is a cooperative effort between individuals to reach a mutual agreement based on consensus and compromise.  Collaborative Divorce provides you with a team of professionals that rally and support you, ensuring that all your needs are met.  Though Arbitration is similar to mediation, it is more like litigation in that the parties present their respective positions, evidence, testimony and witnesses to a trial of fact.

Arbitration is a settlement technique in which a third party reviews the case and imposes a decision that is legally binding for both sides.  The arbitrator may be a retired judge, an experienced trial lawyer, or some other professional selected from a panel of competent arbitrators, such as the American Arbitration Association.  Arbitration can be either voluntary or mandatory and can be either binding or non-binding.  The principal distinction between mediation and arbitration is that whereas a mediator will try to help the parties find a middle ground on which to compromise, the (non-binding) arbitrator remains totally removed from the settlement process and will only give a determination of liability.

Arbitration is most commonly used for the resolution of commercial disputes, but it is desirable in divorce cases when agreement cannot be reached but the parties still wish to save the costs and expenses of litigating through the usual judicial system, which has built-in delays and attendant increased costs.  The Los Angeles County Superior Court sponsors an arbitration program and a “Rent-A-Judge program wherein retired Superior Court judges are available as arbitrators, or will sit as judges on a private basis.  But we’ll talk more about Rent-A-Judge in a later post.

Option 1:  The Kitchen Table
Option 2:  Mediation
Option 3:  Collaborative Divorce
Option 4:  Arbitration
Option 5:  Negotiation in the Shadow of Litigation
Option 6:  Rent-A-Judge
Option 7: Litigation