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What Everyone Who Has or Wants a Family Needs to Know

All personal relationships, from casual dating all the way through marriage and the relationships we have with our children, are governed by the law. Unless you’re a hermit, at some point the law will intersect with your personal relationships. Join us on Tuesday, November 15 at 6:30 p.m. for a discussion designed to cover some areas which will be of concern to everybody attending, even those with perfect marriages and perfect children.

Attorney Ty Supancic will discuss how California’s 2000 page prenuptial agreement (aka the California Family Code) can be overcome with some advance planning by dating couples, designed to strengthen relationships before marriage so that the resulting marriage has a better chance of enduring.

Ty will present and discuss communication tools developed by mental health professionals to enhance relationships before, during, and after marriage. Powerful tools we can bring to bear in all of our relationships.

Even in the best marriage, the law is ever present. Ty will discuss and explain responsibilities couples have to each other, parents have to children, and parents have to the world. This includes child labor law, dealing with troubled children, and planning for your children’s retirement.

If you know someone whose marriage has fallen on hard times, Ty will discuss tools that can help save a marriage, or if it can’t be saved, may help the parties have the least destructive family reorganization possible with the fewest casualties and at the lowest cost.

Not only is divorce second only in stress to the death of a loved one, but it often results in financial disaster. It doesn’t have to be that way. Ty will discuss the seven options couples have if they decide their marriage cannot be saved. The options include creative solutions not considered by any court, which can minimize impact to children and the couple’s finances.

Ty will also discuss the process of dissolution in California. What procedures are required, what pitfalls and dangers might be encountered and how to avert them, and what measures can be taken to minimize the long-term impact. He’ll also discuss relationships after a final divorce decree.

The Law Collaborative takes a holistic view of family law: We realize that divorce isn’t the end. Relationships continue in one form or another, especially if there are children. Without this insight and without proper acknowledgment of this truth and careful planning, a divorce can destroy lives in the long term — solving nothing but creating many new problems.

Ty Supancic is an attorney with a perfect marriage and a perfect child, but that wasn’t always the case. Ty also has a decent sense of humor and will try to utilize it during this discussion. Questions are welcome, refreshments and handouts will be provided.

This seminar is open to the public. Licensed attorneys who attend will earn 1 MCLE Credit. The seminar is on Tuesday, November 15, 2011 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at our office in Woodland Hills. For more information or to register for this seminar today, please visit www.thelawcollaborative.com/events.htm


From Dating Through Divorce

Save the Date for From Dating Through Divorce, an interactive presentation by attorney Ty Supancic of The Law Collaborative. Anyone contemplating marriage, children, or divorce, and those seeking a general overview of how the law relates to families, are invited to attend. Licensed attorneys who attend will earn 1 MCLE Credit. For more information or to register today, please call us toll free at (888) 852-9961 or visit www.thelawcollaborative.com/events.htm.

News Release

Ty Supancic, Esq. Announces Membership in WealthCounsel®

Woodland Hills, CA – August 30, 2011 – Ty Supancic, Esq. today announced that The Law Collaborative, LLC, which recently re-located to Warner Center, has become a member of WealthCounsel®, a nationwide organization of more than 2,200 estate planning attorneys. Members of WealthCounsel® believe in a comprehensive, client-centered approach to estate planning founded on the principles of professional collaboration and a commitment to excellence.

“Estate planning is an ongoing process and not merely a single legal transaction,” said Supancic. “As a member of WealthCounsel®, my firm will have access to a state-of-the-art document drafting system, a network of experienced colleagues throughout the country with whom I can collaborate, and educational resources to keep me on the cutting edge of knowledge.” Supancic stated.

Supancic noted that the majority of Americans do not have a simple will, let alone an estate plan. He stated that he has witnessed many situations where the lack of an estate plan has created unnecessary familial chaos for the client’s beneficiaries so he is particularly passionate about building awareness of the importance of thoughtful planning which includes planning for the care of children and the disposition of new technology assets previously ignored by traditional attorneys.

In addition to WealthCounsel®, Supancic is also a member of the California and Beverly Hills Bar Associations, and is admitted to practice law before the Central District Court.

About The Law Collaborative, LLC
Established in 2009, with over 100 years of combined legal experience, The Law Collaborative, LLC specializes in all areas of estate planning, including asset protection, charitable planning, and business succession planning. They also specialize in all aspects of family law and entertainment law. For more information, please visit www.thelawcollaborative.com/ or call (888) 852-9961.

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Media Contact:
Patricia Frost
818-348-6700

The Marriage Eulogy

By Ty Supancic, Esquire
Associate Attorney at The Law Collaborative, LLP

There is an old saying, “History is written by the winners.”  In litigation, there are winners and losers.  We believe that when parties in crisis choose mediation over litigation, everyone has the potential to come out a winner.  If the winners write history, why can’t the winners in a dissolution write their own history?

Fifty years after a divorce, the children and grandchildren of the original divorcing couple will tell and believe a story about why their parents and grandparents divorced, what kind of people they were, and what aftermath or legacy they left behind.  A couple going through a dissolution has the opportunity to write what they would like that story to be.  By writing that story, and by keeping that story in mind, they can guide their actions and decisions in such a way that the story can become a sort of self-fulfilling prophecy.  Without having the story as a guideline, the parties are building without a plan, traveling without a map. They’ll build something and end up somewhere, but not with anything or anywhere they would have hoped.

The exercise of having individuals who are going through a dissolution of marriage write a “Joint Divorce Story” is not a new idea.  Ron has been recommending it to his clients for years.  Unfortunately, few ever take the time to engage in this useful exercise.  Oftentimes they confuse the Joint Divorce Story with a mission statement or their short-term goals.  The exercise might be more easily understood if it is renamed “The Marriage Eulogy”.

One of our paralegals, Maria, told me that when she was in high school, the nuns had them write their own eulogy as part of a “Death and Dying” class exercise.  The idea was that by writing about all the great things they wanted to be remembered for when they died, one might be guided in making decisions during their lives.  The Marriage Eulogy has the same goal.

At common law, upon marriage a couple ceased to exist as individuals and became one entity.  This concept lives on today as new couples dream about what their married lives will be like.  Couples build powerful dreams that take on lives of their own.  While divorce never ends a relationship, it does end marriage, and with the end of the marriage, that powerful dream of marriage dies.  Couples going through divorce really are witnessing the death of an entity. Psychology informs us that children witnessing the divorce of their parents can be as devastated as a parent losing a child.

Often when we lose somebody important to us, we feel compelled to write a eulogy in honor and memory of that person.  A eulogy is not something scrawled in haste.  It is not something we compose in our heads while driving.  A good eulogy is something we take great pains in writing.  It is something we craft and hone and polish so that the result is powerful and evocative.  We are trying to sum up the essence of an entire being in a few succinct words.  The Marriage Eulogy should be written in such a manner.

When couples are not ready to write a joint eulogy, I have proposed that they write individual eulogies to exchange and reflect on individually.  Knowing how your ex-spouse wants your marriage to be remembered by their grandchildren can be a powerful thing.

One might tread more softly and be more thoughtful if mindful of what history could say about them and their life.  “I can’t think about my ex in that way yet!  It’s too soon.”  Okay, but you could write a fairy tale about how a divorce would be remembered.  That is a powerful starting place.  If we all were to conduct ourselves in accordance with the values and motives of a fairytale hero or heroine, we would all find ourselves kinder, gentler, nobler, and wiser as a result.

About Ty Supancic

Before joining The Law Collaborative, Ty enjoyed working for more than a decade in the entertainment industry. Ty worked for five years as a talent agent representing as many as a hundred clients at a time at one of America’s most recognized entertainment companies before he realized that his detailed, in-depth approach with talent made him better suited for personal management.

Ty left the agency and joined a management and production company where he worked for six years developing talent and entertainment projects. Ty also worked to produce television and film projects, music acts and records, and even a Vegas headliner. As both an agent and a manger, Ty supervised and worked closely with attorneys negotiating talent contracts, drafting production deals, and licensing music for film and television.

Over time Ty realized that, as hard as he worked on behalf of his clients, everything ended up in the hands of the lawyers. If he really wanted to continue helping people using the skills he had developed, he had to become an attorney. With this realization, Ty enrolled in the California Bar’s Law Office Study Program and began “reading the law” at TLC.

After passing the First Year Law Student’s Exam, Ty continued his studies, passed the California Bar Exam, and was sworn in as a licensed attorney. Ty is thankful that California is one of the seven states that still provide an avenue to study and become an attorney on the traditional path followed by Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln.

Having worked as a paralegal during his studies, Ty continues to focus his practice in the area of Consensual Dispute Resolution and believes his expertise in transactional law and his non-traditional schooling work to his clients’ advantage. Law schools focus on adversarial, Win-Lose approaches which make Consensual Dispute Resolution methods difficult for many of their graduates. By omitting the usual adversarial indoctrination from his schooling, Ty hopes to forge new solutions for conflict resolution and expand the application of Consensual Dispute Resolution to other areas of law.